Newsroom

CROW CAWs


Red tide is the result of a specific kind of harmful algal bloom. Algal blooms result from a combination of environmental factors including available nutrients, sunlight, temperature, ecosystem disturbance, hydrology, and water chemistry. Harmful algae blooms can also be the result of nutrient dense waste, such as nitrogen or phosphorus rich water which can enter aquatic systems by way of fertilizer runoff or other pollution such as herbicides and pesticides. Some of these algal blooms can get so large they are visible from outer space satellite images. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Kemp's Ridley (#21-6362)


The Kemp’s ridley (Lepidochelys kempii) is the world’s most endangered species of sea turtle as well as the smallest and rarest of the seven sea turtles in the world. The marine reptile has a triangularshaped head and a slightly hooked beak. Its carapace is uniform in shape, making its upper shell almost circular in appearance. more...

CROW Feathers: Keeley Peek


CROW Feathers is a chance for you to meet and learn a little bit about the staff, students, and volunteers working behind-the-scenes to help rescue, rehabilitate and release the thousands of wildlife patients admitted to CROW's hospital each year! more...

CROW Case of the Week: Osprey (#21-6249)


The osprey (Pandion haliaetus) is a large hawk that resides and lingers around nearly any body of water. Regarded as a great angler, this raptor has a unique diet of live fish and will dive with feet outstretched into the water to catch them. more...

2022 Speaker Series


The Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) is pleased to announce the return of the 2022 Speaker Series. Talks will be available in person this year with a select few being offered virtually. more...