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CROW CAWs


This week's CAW | Taking Steps to Protect Wildlife - Since the beginning of 2021, we have admitted 360 wild animals after negative cat or dog interactions. Over half of those admissions were specifically cat attack victims. So far in 2021, we have seen at least one cat attack victim each day. Cats are natural hunters and effective predators who will hunt for fun – not necessarily because they are hungry or need to eat. Domestic cats, like other invasive species, can devastate the native wildlife populations of birds and other small mammals. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Striped Skunks (#21-4744 & #21-4745)


The striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) is a medium-sized mammal with a glossy black coat, a thin, white stripe between its eyes and two stripes on its back. Skunk babies are blind and deaf when they are born. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Wood Stork (#21-4617)


The wood stork (Mycteria americana) is a large black-and-white waterbird with long legs and black flight feathers. It breeds in Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas, while non-breeding wood storks can be found throughout North America and into northern Argentina. While they are often the same size, wood storks differ from herons by the size of their bills (thicker) and shape of their bills (more curved than herons). A wood stork also has a featherless neck and head, with gray rough, scaly skin covering that area. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Chuck-will's-widow (#21-4591)


The Chuck-will’s-widow (Antrostomus carolinensis) is a nocturnal bird from the nightjar family, which can be characterized by long wings, short legs and tiny bills. It is an extremely well-camouflaged bird due to its brown coloring and dark patterned feathers. It naturally likes to sit on roadsides at night and can be spotted in headlights where its eyes appear to glow. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Gopher Tortoise (#21-4180)


The gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) is a docile creature that uses the claws on its feet to dig burrows for its underground home that also provides shelter for many other animal species. While this type of turtle can probably bite back to protect itself, it usually does not and instead tends to pull its head into its shell and use its front legs as a shield. more...